instagram pinterest linkedin facebook twitter goodreads facebook circle twitter circle linkedin circle instagram circle goodreads circle pinterest circle

Picturing a World

Japanese garden

In these troubled times, gardens offer comfort and inspiration. Exploring the Museum Computer Network portal, I got to the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento where where I found this painting by Theodore Wores. Wores, a San Franciscan who was influenced by James McNeill Whistler, went to Japan, learned the language, and brought Impressionist techniques to painting landscapes there. (Another example is his Street in Ikao.)

 

The Iris Flowers of Horikiri called to mind two things: First, the Asian-influenced garden, Innisfree, in Millbrook New York, where irises border a stream. Second, Natasha Pulley's Lost Future of Pepperharrow, most of which takes place in Japan in the 1890's and includes a Japanese estate with many gardens.

 

 Read More 

Be the first to comment

Fantasy dancer—which way matters

I keep having fun with Natasha Pulley's exercise for starting a fantasy story. Consider this image posted earlier. On a restless night recently, I jotted down these five impossible things.
 Read More 

Be the first to comment

Shelter in place

I was searching the McClung Collection of the Knox County (Tennessee) Public Library for a totally different historic image when I ran across this house plan from 1901 (Mattie might know someone back in Ohio who built just such a house). House plans are wonderful aids to imagining places in fiction, and local libraries like the Knoxville can be unexpectedly rich sources of images.
 
In this case, however, what struck me was how useful the image was for carrying out Natasha Pulley's exercise in starting a fantasy story. Remember? It has three parts: List five impossible things. Choose one and list questions related to "If this is true, what else must be true?" Think about those particulars, then write a paragraph.

 Read More 

Be the first to comment

Fact and fantasy in self-isolation

I first read Natasha Pulley's Bedlam Stacks in a library copy. I liked it, but not as much as The Watchmaker of Filigree Street. Or so I thought. Still, after a while I decided to buy a copy to have on hand, knowing I would want to reread it someday. The day came as soon as I put down The Lost Future of Pepperharrow, and very glad I was to have it with libraries and bookstores now closed. I loved it on second reading! It sent me Googling Pulley, which led to two links that are worth pursuing if you are interested in the interweave of fact and fiction.

 Read More 

Be the first to comment