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Picturing a World

Cut-out frames

Yesterday's image of women gilders reminded me of the cut-outs I made after reading Anthea Callen’s chapter, “Framing the Debate,” in her indispensable book  Read More 
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Female picture framers

Blog tip: This French image of women workers gilding picture frames is reposted from a post on women in the picture framing business in England at The Frame Blog. Frames were expensive, which is why  Read More 
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Lady of Shalott

Tennyson’s “Lady of Shalott” was the first poem I can remember choosing myself to memorize for school, and I still sometimes murmur, On either side the river lie/Long fields of barley and of rye …. When Jeanette is worried  Read More 
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Rocks at L'Estaque

This painting was at the back of my mind for when I imagined a vineyard terraced below a limestone escarpment on the grounds of Dr. Aubanel’s sanatorium. Edward helps tend grapevines there in February 1880. It tickled me to discover in preparing this post that the picture was painted two years later in February 1882  Read More 
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Crime and dance

Sometimes interests converge. A recent post on The Gangs of Paris at the Victorian Paris blog sent me investigating the story-telling, tough-guy, tough-gal Danse Apache or Apache Dance (pronounced ah-PAHSH in both French and English), which originated in France and quickly moved to the American stage in 1908.  Read More 
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Translations, please!

Blog tip and request: At his highly informative website, Darren Rousar is making available an 1867 drawing manual, page by page as it is translated. Click here for details on the manual, its importance, and how you can help. Read More 
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On horseback, in pants

For my work-in-progress, I’ve been reading the autobiography of journalist Ida M. Tarbell, All in the Day’s Work. In 1892 for a McClure’s Magazine article, Tarbell interviewed the French archeologist and writer Jane Henriette Magre Dieulafoy, who with her husband Marcel worked on excavations in Persia.  Read More 
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Amélie Helga Lundhal

Blog tip: For a Cyrillic-alphabet blog post with several images of work by the Finnish artist Amélie Helga Lundhal (1850–1914), who studied at the Académie Julian and painted in Brittany, click here.
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Venice

Originally, I meant for the Dolsons just to vanish. People do (or did before the internet) and Jeanette’s circle of friends in Paris must inevitably break apart. Novels, however, make demands their own. When I reread my almost completed  Read More 
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Hassam's room

Quickly, another not-really-empty room to compare to Anna Ancher’s. Again, a female figure is hardly more than a part of the color pattern, but, oh, to be reading with her in that room! For this and two more “It’s almost summer” paintings at the It’s About Time blog, click here.  Read More 
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