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Picturing a World

Woman Suffrage procession, March 3

Efforts to pass the 19th Amendment (""The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex") began in 1878. On the day before Woodrow Wilson was inaugurated president on March 4, 1913, the National American Woman Suffrage Association's procession in Washington, D.C., highlighted and energized a new push to get it passed. I suppose one can regret that a commission for this cover was given to illustrator Benjamin Moran Dale instead of woman, but then again talent should not be denied or abridged on account of sex! For interior pages of the program, click here. For the participation by a Black sorority, click here. For a college student's excellent essay with photographs, click here. Now, if only the vote had brought equal pay for equal work …

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Smith College art class

And now back to school! Early in my research on women’s art education, I  Read More 

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Theresa Bernstein’s Suffrage Meeting

Website tip: A woman artist depicting the women’s suffrage movement—what could fit my interests better? You, too, may find Theresa Bernstein website from the CUNY Graduate Center and Baruch College a rich source of images and inspiration. Bernstein’s career covered the entire 20th C, and the website has images of her artwork (including sketchbooks) along with a bibliography of her writing.

Happy Fourth of July—and happy voting! Read More 

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Sororis Club

Blog post tip: In Where the Light Falls, I invented a private supper club for my women artists. With my eye turned now toward New York City and woman’s suffrage, it is fascinating to read about the feminist Sorosis Club’s first lunch at public restaurant, Delmonico’s.

For a digitization of an 1893 article about the club in Cosmopolitan Magazine, click hereRead More 

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Female comic book illustrators

Website alert: Golly, a whole new dimension for Mattie Palmer’s world of publishing (and suffagism): Women Who Conquered the Comics World. Via Two Nerdy History Girls.
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London working-class suffragists

Blog alert:The Spitalsfield Life post for February 7, 2017, Celebrating East End Suffragettes focuses on working class women in London during the fight for the vote. Great maps! Read More 
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Lucy Stone’s milk wagon

I have set ANON in 1908 partly to avoid the need to account for all the glorious woman’s suffrage activity of 1912 and partly because the anxieties, tensions, and precursors to major historical events provide uncertainties that give room for fictional exploration. I try to avoid anachronisms and stay within historical constraints. All the same,  Read More 

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Suffragist banner

Website tip: Today's History Blog post tells how the People's History Museum in Manchester, England, purchased this banner from a private collector who had bought it at a charity auction in June. Suffragists, textiles, people and government agencies working together to preserve history—yes!

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Woman-Suffrage Map

Since 1908 is my magic year for ANONYMITY, imagine my pleasure in finding this Woman-Suffrage Map while exploring Cornell’s Mode Collection of Persuasive Cartography. The map appears in an article in Harper’s Weekly which reports on the status of the international woman’s suffragist movement with none of the hostility or arch humor that mar too much male journalism of the period. Read More 
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Suffragists in advertising

Blog alert: This image from a 1908 advertising campaign that never happened appeared in a Princeton University special collections post, Selling Cigarettes with Suffragettes. Irresistible to repost here, even though I don’t really have a point to make!
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